Eating Wild Game Benefits Your Health

One misconception about “organic” meat is we assume the animals are allowed to roam free. Sadly, this is not always the case. There is no doubt about the “free range” of wild game.

Eating greens in the wild also contributes to a lower content of pro-inflammatory omega-6 fatty acids and a higher content of anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids, which is essential for heart and brain health. The feeding of corn and grain to farm animals not only increases the total fat content but also the omega-6 fatty acid content, neither one of which are good for your health. Grass-fed beef or bison have similar increased omega-3 fatty acid content making them healthier than grain fed beef. A three ounce serving of venison has 133 calories and one gram of fat per ounce. Elk specifically, derives only 22% of the meat energy from fat, as compared with 33% for beef.

Venison is low in cholesterol, and the ratio of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids is higher than in conventional red meats.

Wild game meat has long provided hunters with an excellent source of protein. A 3 ounce serving of venison contains about 22 grams of protein and a 3 ounce serving of buffalo contains about 24 grams of protein. This about the same as a chicken drumstick, slightly less than a chicken breast, and higher than the same size serving of beef. Venison also has less cholesterol per serving than chicken.

With growing concerns about over-consumption of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance, you can rest assured a venison steak won’t contain antibiotics or contribute to the proliferation of super-bugs. There are also no added growth hormones or scary fillers.

This type of meat contains a lot of vitamins and minerals, including vitamin B complex. It is richer in iron, niacin, and B vitamins than commercial meats. These nutrients are essential for proper metabolism and healthy maintenance of tissue and nerves. Additionally, venison also contains around 5 to 6 grams of calcium,and it is also high in iron, phosphorus, magnesium, zinc, and potassium. These minerals are essential for nerve development, cardiovascular health, and proper regulation of blood serum cholesterol