Monthly Archives: June 2017

The God Food for Nutrition

This small, round, sweet, juicy, delicious red fruit is one of the largest consuming vegetables in the world, not only because of its culinary purpose but also due to its numerous health benefits and nutrition. Tomato for skin cancer was just the latest example for its infinite fitness blessings.

From the time immemorial, there exists a long love affair between man and tomato due to its capacity for better acclimatization to various environment. Today, it comes in a vast array of varieties differing in colour, size, shape and taste. Now tomato has emerged as one of the most desired vegetables in the world due to its unique taste and nutritional qualities. More than 100 new tomato varieties are being made available in the world market with each passing year.

The health benefits of tomatoes gave it the title “God food” and forms an integral part of cuisines all over the world. Tomato is also a good source of potassium, manganese, magnesium, phosphorous and copper. Organic compounds like lycopene also attribute to the health benefits. The criteria for selection of tomato varies with country and the culture. Asian markets for tomatoes are particular about lighter colours while in European markets, small shapes of tomatoes are preferred.
So how the “God food” Is a dominate the seed market? A report by Market Intelligence, a market research firm, states, ‘The Tomato Seed Market revenue covers a whopping 829.8 Million USD of the 7.8 Billion USD revenue of Vegetable Seed Market’. The numerical figure clearly depicts the dominance of seed market by tomatoes.

Tomato is the most widely grown and consumed vegetable globally. China is the largest producer of tomatoes followed by India, United States, Turkey and Egypt. The food processing market occupies 30% of the destination market for tomato while 70% of it is consumed as fresh produce

Eating Wild Game Benefits Your Health

One misconception about “organic” meat is we assume the animals are allowed to roam free. Sadly, this is not always the case. There is no doubt about the “free range” of wild game.

Eating greens in the wild also contributes to a lower content of pro-inflammatory omega-6 fatty acids and a higher content of anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids, which is essential for heart and brain health. The feeding of corn and grain to farm animals not only increases the total fat content but also the omega-6 fatty acid content, neither one of which are good for your health. Grass-fed beef or bison have similar increased omega-3 fatty acid content making them healthier than grain fed beef. A three ounce serving of venison has 133 calories and one gram of fat per ounce. Elk specifically, derives only 22% of the meat energy from fat, as compared with 33% for beef.

Venison is low in cholesterol, and the ratio of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids is higher than in conventional red meats.

Wild game meat has long provided hunters with an excellent source of protein. A 3 ounce serving of venison contains about 22 grams of protein and a 3 ounce serving of buffalo contains about 24 grams of protein. This about the same as a chicken drumstick, slightly less than a chicken breast, and higher than the same size serving of beef. Venison also has less cholesterol per serving than chicken.

With growing concerns about over-consumption of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance, you can rest assured a venison steak won’t contain antibiotics or contribute to the proliferation of super-bugs. There are also no added growth hormones or scary fillers.

This type of meat contains a lot of vitamins and minerals, including vitamin B complex. It is richer in iron, niacin, and B vitamins than commercial meats. These nutrients are essential for proper metabolism and healthy maintenance of tissue and nerves. Additionally, venison also contains around 5 to 6 grams of calcium,and it is also high in iron, phosphorus, magnesium, zinc, and potassium. These minerals are essential for nerve development, cardiovascular health, and proper regulation of blood serum cholesterol

Medicine Food

How global market is responding to this segment of medicinal foods?

A report by a market research firm, estimates a healthy growth rate of 6.3% for rapidly growing global nutraceutical market, over 2017-2022, and the market is estimated to be valued at294.79 billion, by 2022 end.

Developed countries are investing heavily in R&D, pertaining to the general well-being of their fellow citizens, along with the sharp rise in medical expenses, to tackle chronic and lifestyle diseases. Preventive approach to health has been the rising trend globally, with developing countries meeting their public health targets, and consistently increasing the proportion of GDP allotted for the healthcare sector.

Nutraceuticals are increasingly becoming a part of the daily diet, owing to the rising incidences of lifestyle diseases, improved standards of living, and inadequate nutritional intake – lack of balance diets. Increasing mortality rates, in developing countries, due to inadequate nutrition, is making nutraceuticals the ‘must-have’ component in daily diet.

Nutraceuticals are broadly segmented into, dietary supplements and functional food & beverage. The latter occupies approximately 60% of the market share globally, owing to its ease of availability, and natural presence in most diets consumed worldwide.

Regionally, Asia-Pacific has been largest market for nutraceuticals, with dietary supplements and functional food being increasingly recommended by dieticians and physicians. Dietary supplements segment of the nutraceutical industry leads the Asia- Pacific market, while the functional foods segment is growing at a fast pace.

The worldwide trend of increasing health consciousness, rising public demand of organic & natural products, sedentary lifestyles in socio-economic scenario, rising prevalence of chronic diseases, and favorable governments support, is expected to boost the global nutraceutical market in near future.

Globally, the major watchdogs and their bylaws regulating and monitoring the nutraceuticals market are:
– Codex Alimentarius of FAO and WHO
– Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of USFDA
– Functional Food Science in Europe (FUFOSE)
– Foods For Specified Health Use (FOSHU) in Japan
– Food Safety and Standard Act 2006 in India

The main hurdles for market are; Different regulatory bodies around the world have different approaches to nutraceuticals. For example, in Japan, functional foods are defined according to their use of natural ingredients. On the other hand, functional foods in the US usually contain ingredients that are products of biotechnology. The discrepancy, pertaining to the global nutraceuticals market, needs to be synchronized and standardized, to have a general consensus on the framework dealing with its – processing, export-import, packaging, and subsequent storage.

 

Creams and Sauces

Taco salsa, taco sauce and taco crema/cre mes: is there a difference?

Not everyone operates on the level of sophistication of a fish taco catering company. And yet Mexican-style food is a subspecialty of just about every respectable amateur chef. So it’s useful to know the difference, particularly with gourmet fish tacos.

And if you’re host to a large event with a fiesta theme, it might make your planning conversation with your taco caterers go better to know the difference as well. Some guests might prefer a salsa over a sauce, or a sauce over a crema, or maybe a crema over both (note: the better vendors will offer a full selection).

Part of the confusion is just about everyone knows that the Spanish word for sauce is salsa. But in gastronomy, the two are not interchangeable. The best defining differences we can offer are the following:

Taco salsa: These tend to be the chunkier, tomato-based (or tomatillo, for a green salsa verde) made with fresh chiles and other seasonings. A salsa might have corn or even fruit as an ingredient. For the most part, a salsa is a mix of uncooked ingredients.

Taco sauce: The ingredients – chiles, onions, sometimes tomatoes – are roasted or cooked and blended. Cooking reduces the sauce (removes moisture) and blends the tastes, but because it’s more finely rendered by blending (or minced chopping) it generally is more liquid than a salsa. It just pairs better with seafood than does a salsa.

Taco crema/crèmes: By and large, the defining characteristic is the use of mayonnaise, yogurt or sour crème (or several of these), with many of the same chiles and tomatoes or tomatillos as in sauces and salsas. Recipes often urge the use of a crema on fish tacos; some say it’s reminiscent of tartar sauces used in more northern latitudes.

Now, just to confuse things many restaurants will interchangeably use these terms. There are also regional differences in how the terms are applied. A visit to chat boards on this topic shows wide disagreement between East and West Coast people on the topic.